Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

PEER-REVIEWED NEWSPAPER

The Peer-reviewed Newspaper publication series presents the outcome of a series of research/PhD workshops investigating contemporary digital culture. Since 2011, DARC has organized the workshops with transmediale festival Berlin, and included shifting partners from cultural as well as academic research institutions. At the workshops, participants interrogate the festival theme, but also reflect on possible relations to existing research practices, including peer-review, austerity measures, the scalability of research, and more. The participants are asked to write a paper and present it at a workshop. Based on this mode of peer-review they are then asked to shorten their research into the length of a newspaper article for distribution at the transmediale festival. Following the event, they are invited to submit a full version to a special issue of A Peer-reviewed Journal About [the selected research theme] (APRJA).

Vol 9 No 1 (2020): RESEARCH NETWORKS (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen, Clemens Apprich, Sudipto Basu, Wenhao Bi, Nicola Bozzi, Geoff Cox, Maria Dada, Iuliia Glushneva, Naja Grundtmann, Rebecca Holt, Ozgun Eylul Iscen, Linda Kronman, Wing Ki Lee, Joshua Neves, Rodrigo Ochigame, Juan Pablo Pacheco, Søren Pold, Cristina Ribas, Maximilian Schlüter, Tatjana Seitz, Winnie Soon, Magda Tyzlik-Carver, Giseli Vasconcellos, Tatiana Wells.

Design:  Open Source Publishing, Brussels
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

This publication is a raw unedited record of mail list exchanges in advance of a research workshop at the Canadian Embassy in Berlin (29-30 Jan 2020) and public presentations at Volksbühne (31 Jan 2020), as part of transmediale 2020 End to End which aimed to deal with the pervasiveness of networks and their limits. By drawing on the legacies of critical and autonomous network cultures, contributions discuss whether there is a conceivable counter-power to networks? Which alternative technological models and cultural narratives are needed to construct the principles of end-to-end communication anew? How might the critique of networks extend to non-western contexts and reflect the limits in a global canonical perspective?

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), Centre for the Study of the Networked Image (London South Bank University), Global Emergent Media (GEM) Lab, Concordia University, and transmediale. The workshop was part of the Marshall McLuhan Salon at the Canadian Embassy in Berlin.

Vol 8 No 1 (2019): MACHINE FEELING (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen,  Anne Alexander, Mitra Azar, Alan Blackwell, Anja Breljak, Geoff Cox, Michela De Carlo, Maria Dada, Iain Emsley, Malthe Stavning Erslev, Jennifer Gabrys, Daniel Chavez Heras, Kristoffer Gansing, Tomasz Hollanek, Leonardo Impett, Maike Klein, Rosemary Lee, Carleigh Morgan, Carman Ng, Matteo Pasquinelli, Sascha Pohflepp, Søren Pold, Irina Raskin, Tiara Roxanne, Winnie Soon, Magda Tyzlik-Carver, Rebecca Uliasz, Tanja Wiehn, Martin Zeilinger, Brett Zehner

Design:  The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger: Simon Schindele, Bárbara Acevedo Strange, Manuel Bürger
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

This publication presents abstracts and abstractions developed through a workshop held at University of Cambridge, and organized in collaboration between transmediale festival, Aarhus University, and Cambridge Digital Humanities Learning Programme. It presents a critical inquiry into new technologies of feeling, recognizing that digital culture has become instrumental for capturing and managing what Raymond Williams’ would once have called “structures of feeling”—referring to lived experiences and cultural expressions, distinct from supposedly fixed social products and institutions. It focuses specifically on the domain of machine learning and on the ability of technologies to capture and structure feelings and experiences that are active, in flux, and in the present.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), Cambridge Digital Humanities Learning Programme (University of Cambridge), and transmediale. 

Vol 7 No 1 (2018): RESEARCH VALUES (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen, César Escudero Andaluz, Emanuele Andreoli, Marie-Luise Angerer, Kim Albrecht, Calum Bowden, Tega Brain, Geoff Cox, Jan Distelmeyer, Maria Eriksson, Marc Garrett, Francis Hunger, Lea Laura Michelsen, Joana Moll, Luke Munn, Dionysia Mylonaki, Martín Nadal, Nelly Yaa Pinkrah, Søren Pold, Konstanze Scheidt, Francesco Sebregondi, Winnie Soon, Pip Thornton, Panagiotis Tigas, Magda Tyzlik-Carver, Ashley Lee Wong

Design: Sarah Garcin & Angeline Ostinelli
ISBN: 87-91810-28-0
EAN: 9788791810282
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

There is value and there are values. There is the measure of wealth, metrified and calculated in numerous ways, and there are ideas, ethics, preferences of taste, and customs of ideology. […] But what really happens when the two are conflated? How do we understand how the values associated with something give it value; or, how giving something a value affords certain values? And, in what ways are the conflations of value and values tied to the circulation of value and values in contemporary technical infrastructures? […] The articles published in A Peer-Reviewed Journal About Research Values interrogate value and values in ways that respond to techno-cultural shifts and embrace the range of economies that pervade digital culture.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), The Brandenburg Centre for Media Studies (ZeM), and transmediale.

Vol 6 No 1 (2017): MACHINE RESEARCH (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Roel Roscam Abbing, Christian Ulrik Andersen, Geoff Cox, Maya Ganesh, Abelardo Gil-Fournier, Maja Bak Herrie, John Hill, Brian House, Nathan Jones, Nicolas Malevé, Rosa Menkman, An Mertens, Martino Morandi,  Michael Murtaugh, Søren Pold, Søren Rasmussen, Renée Ridgway, Jara Rocha, Sam Skinner, Femke Snelting

Design: Sarah Garcin & Angeline Ostinelli
ISBN: 87-91810-28-0
EAN: 9788791810282
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

This publication is about MACHINE RESEARCH – research on machines, research with machines, and research as a machine. It thus explores machinic perspectives to suggest a situation where the humanities are put into a critical perspective by machine driven ecologies, ontologies and epistemologies of thinking and acting. It aims to engage research and artistic practice that takes into account the new materialist conditions implied by nonhuman techno-ecologies. These include new ontologies and intelligence such as machine learning, machine reading and listening, systems-oriented perspectives to broadcast communication and conflict, the ethics and aesthetics of autonomous systems, and other post-anthropocentric reconsiderations of materiality and infrastructure.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), Constant (a non-profit, artist-run association for art and media based in Brussels), and transmediale.

Vol 5 No 1 (2016): EXCESSIVE RESEARCH (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen & Geoff Cox.

Christian Ulrik Andersen, Mitra Azar, Elisavet Christou, Geoff Cox, Aideen Doran, Kristoffer Gansing, Pablo Velasco Gonzalez, Lone Koefoed hansen, Nathan Jones, Joasia Krysa, Graziele Lautenschlaeger, Lyndsay Mann, Cornelia Sollfrank, Wolfgang sützl, Marie Louise Juul Søndergaard, Cansu Topaloglu, Scott Wark, Tessa Zettel

Design: The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger, Manuel Bürger & Hendrike Nagel
ISBN:  7-91810-27-2
EAN: 9788791810275
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

EXCESSIVE RESEARCH asks: What happens when research is less about exchange and more about excess?

It relates to the announcement of transmediale 2016, Conversation Piece which highlights the compulsive actions of digital culture, and how we are constantly encouraged to stay active, to make, to share and to secure. Following a research workshop in Liverpool, organised in partnership with Liverpool John Moores University and the Liverpool Biennial, this issue of APRJA delves into the nature of these actions and their limits.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Biennial, and transmediale.

Vol 4 No 1 (2015): DATAFIED RESEARCH (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen & Geoff Cox.

Design:  The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger
ISBN:  87-91810-26-4
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF // TXT

This issue of APRJA examines the implications of datafication for research. Following a research workshop at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong in October 2014, it addresses the thematic framework of the 2015 transmediale festival “Capture All” as a research topic: “to investigate and propose actions that push against the limits of today’s pervasive quantification of life, work and play”, as the call explains. Indeed, to what extent does data “capture all” – even research?

We produce, share, collect, archive, use and misuse, knowingly or not, massive amounts of data, but what does its “capture” do to us? What are the inter-subjective relations between data-commodity and human subjects? In asking these questions, the articles in this journal seek insights into the logics of data flows between materials, things, data, code, software, interfaces and other stuff that permeates the cultures of datafication. Rather than merely mimicking the sciences’ use of (big) data, the arts and humanities must explore what kind of sensorium datafication generates for things and humans. What are the implications of being data? What are the darker forces involved in capturing and using data?

The layout of this publication comes in the form of a wall-newspaper. The included articles can additionally be downloaded as a text file.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), School of Creative Media at City University of Hong Kong, and transmediale.

Vol 3 No 1 (2014): POST DIGITAL RESEARCH (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by: Jamie Allen, Christian Ulrik Andersen, Josephine Bosma, James Charlton, Budhaditya Chattopadhyay, Geoff Cox, Florian Cramer, Jonas Fritsch, David Gauthier, Robert Jackson, Magnus Lawrie, Alessandro Ludovico, Kieran Nolan, Georgios Papadopoulos, Lotte Philipsen, Søren Pold, Eric Snodgrass, Bodil Marie Stavning Thomsen, Winnie Soon.

Design:  Design by The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger. Manuel Bürger, Timm Häneke, Caroline Wolewinski.
EAN: 9788791810213
ISBN: 87-91810-21-3
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

Post-digital Research addresses the messy and paradoxical condition of art and media after digital technology revolutions. It critically reflects on the term "post-digital".

The issue is the outcome of a process where a number of researchers, artist-researchers and Ph.D.'s have collaborated in presenting and exchanging ideas around the subject. This follows an earlier call from transmediale festival, Berlin, and a research event at Kunsthal Aarhus. The issue does not present a uniform interpretation of the notion, but includes a variety of positions related to the use of the term, its application within various fields, and how it is reflected in artistic research.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University) and transmediale. The Workshop was hosted by Kunsthal Aarhus.

Vol 2 No 1 (2013): RESEARCHING BWPWAP (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by: Christian Ulrik Andersen, Tatiana Bazzichelli, Armin Beverungen, Geoff Cox, Kristoffer Gansing.

Design:  The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger
ISBN: 87-91810-25-6
EAN: 9788791810251
ISSN (PRINT): 2245-7593
ISSN (PDF): 2245-7607

PDF

Researching BWPWAP asks what kinds of technological and artistic practices might produce radical effects for an institutionalized research culture? How can we save research from itself?

In referring to the cancellation of Pluto’s planetary status in 2006, BWPWAP (Back When Pluto Was a Planet), the 2013 edition of the transmediale festival interrogates techno-cultural processes of displacement and invention, and asks for artistic and speculative responses to new cultural imaginaries. In light of this, the conference and workshop Researching BWPWAP took place in November 2012 in Lüneburg, Germany, organised jointly by Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Aarhus University and the reSource transmedial culture/transmediale.

This newspaper presents some outcomes of this process, and like the conference and workshop, it can be interpreted in the context of a research culture that has been significantly destabilized by network culture and digital media. Certainly, much research culture has shared Pluto’s fate: conferences reduced to networking events to foster cultural capital, and scholarly communications reduced to impact factors measured by grant givers. In other words, research is not just about measuring the performativity of a single researcher (the peer-reviewed journal system), but also the processes of questioning, investigating, speculating, and sharing between peers in a broader sense.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), Leuphana University of Lüneburg, and transmediale.

Vol 1 No 2 (2012): IN/COMPATIBLE RESEARCH (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen, Tatiana Bazzichelli, Geoff Cox, Kristoffer Gansing

Design:  The Laboratory of Manuel Bürger, Manuel Bürger, Timm Haneke
ISBN:  87-91810-20-5

PDF

World of the News – The world’s greatest peer-reviewed newspaper of in/compatible research presents cutting edge in/compatible research in an accessible free tabloid format.

The newspaper partly addresses academia’s increasing demand for publication of academic peer-reviewed journal articles. Perhaps researchers need new visions of how to produce and consume research? The content of the newspaper derives from a PhD workshop and conference held in November 2011, at University of the Arts, Berlin (organized by Aarhus University in collaboration with transmediale/resource for transmedial culture and the Vilém Flusser Archive.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University), the Vilém Flusser Archive (University of the Arts, Berlin), and transmediale.

Vol 1 No 1 (2011): PUBLIC INTERFACES (Peer-reviewed newspaper)

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen, Geoff Cox, Jacob Lund

Design: Christian Ulrik Andersen, Geoff Cox, Ida Knudsen
ISBN: 87-91810-18-3 / EAN: 9788791810183

PDF

Emerging from ongoing research around interface criticism, the aim of this newspaper is to broaden the topic to encompass the changing concept of the ’public’. 

The newspaper is organized into three thematic strands: ART as public interface; the public interfaces of URBAN space; the public interface and CAPITAL. The newspaper brings together researchers within diverse fields – across aesthetics, cultural theory, architecture and urban studies – united by the need to understand public interfaces and the possible paradigmatic changes they pose to these fields.

The workshop leading to this publication is a collaboration between Digital Aesthetics Research Centre (Aarhus University) and Plymouth University.